Lean Change Management Cycle

Build your own change management framework by using a feedback-driven approach

Lean Change Management Cycle

Insights: Before you can plan any change, you need to understand the current state of the organization. To do that, there are many tools, assessments, and models you can apply to understand the current state. The book describes many practices you can use to collect Insights.

Options: Once you’ve gained enough Insights to start planning, you need Options. Options have a cost, value and impact. Options usually include one or more hypotheses and expected benefits. These hypotheses are turned into Experiments when you are ready to introduce a change.

Experiments: At this point you’ve learned enough about your current state and considered multiple Options. Now it’s time to introduce a change and see if it works out the way you thought it would.

Experiments also have a sub-cycle:

Prepare: This is the planning stage of your Experiment. Later on in this book I describe some light-weight planning and sense-making tools you can use to prepare your Experiments. The key point about the Prepare step is that at this point, all you have are your assumptions about the change. It is in this step that you validate your approach with the people affected by the change

Introduce: This is the step where you start working with the people affected by the change. Once a change has reached this step, it’s considered to be in process. Ideally you will be limiting the number of changes happening at the same time.
Review: Here you review the outcomes of the Experiment. Typically you do this after the amount of time you thought would be needed for the change to stick.

Review: Here you review the outcomes of the Experiment. Typically you do this after the amount of time you thought would be needed for the change to stick.