This week’s episode features a few people from Canada, the US and Australia. Our topic, debating the arguments from Episode 1 with Paul Gibbons. Is pop psychology all that bad or is it necessary for more people to have surface knowledge as opposed to deep knowledge of these change models?

We also talked about organizational coaching and how agile and OD intersect.

Participants:

Ro Gorrell: As an independent consultant, business coach, facilitator and author, I specialize in helping organisations understand and manage the lifecycle of change using three different yet connected approaches.

My core skillset is helping clients understand how change impacts business performance and helping individuals and teams move from current state to future state. This encompasses managing change, talent management, programme and project management as well as benefits management. My approach is practical, straightforward and to the point helping you create a change strategy fit for purpose – achieving outcomes that lead to benefits.

Ewan O’Leary: Ewan is an enterprise agile coach based in the US.

Phil Rogers: Phil is a Scrum Master in the Digital Media group at NPR, where he works as an agile facilitator with multiple teams. Before joining NPR in 2014, Phil served as a Scrum Master and Agile Coach, for clients that include Bank of America, Fidelity Investments, and the Department of Homeland Security. Over his twenty-year career in the IT industry, other employers have included Intel Corporation, Cisco Systems, MPath Interactive (a massive multiplayer gaming startup), the US Marine Corps, and Family Health International (now called FHI 360). His career began with seven years of service as a USAF Officer.

Manjit Singh: Startup entrepreneur –Agile coaching & software development. Intuitive product designer. Passion for social justice. Founder . Mad soccer fan!

Jason Little
Author, Lean Change Management at Leanintuit
I began my career as a web developer when Cold Fusion roamed the earth. Over the following years, I moved into management, Agile Coaching and consulting. The bumps and bruises I collected along the way helped me realize that helping organizations adopt Agile practices was less about the practices, and all about change.
In 2008 I attended an experiential learning conference (AYE) about how people experience change and since then, I’ve been writing, and speaking, all over the world about helping organizations discover more effective practices for managing organizational change.